aggie113
Related to the other post about broken screws, I have struck out locally with watch/jewelry repair shops to get the broken screws extracted from the Halo base.  Anyone know of a shop that might be able to do such work?  I don't mind shipping the part out to get it done.
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Nepa Dean
Try sending microtech an email,they might be able to help you out
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aggie113
Nepa Dean wrote:
Try sending microtech an email,they might be able to help you out

Obviously, that is one option, but looking at others as well.
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mrtman
"No" is a good jeweler's default answer.  Consider their POV: Much of the stuff they repair is irreplaceable (to someone); their work is often scrutinized under 10x-20x magnification, and the only way they can fix a mistake is to make it bigger (i.e., polishing it down or compensating you for the loss).

Try another shop, be persistent.  Look for smaller multigenerational ones.  Places like that have worked miracles for me on several gun and jewelry "projects" I thought were ruined or impossible.   If you find an eager, young, or chatty jeweler, you've accidentally walked into a mall.  Don't do that.  Paradoxically, cleanliness and lighting are inversely proportional to the quality of the work you'll receive.  If your first thought through the door is, "I bet this place also sells gremlins or cursed monkey paws," you're probably in the right place.

Be polite and browse their store a little before you ask them to fix your switchblade.  (To most normies, it's kind of an odd request.) When you do make your pitch, don't tell them what it cost.  Don't act too excited or attached to the outcome.  If they agree to do the work, leave it with them.

If they're on the fence, buy a cheap pair of earrings for your wife/girlfriend and press harder while you're paying.  I got earrings, a BJ, and a blade stop pin removed from an Ultratech for $50 in BFE Nebraska with that approach; (the sequence of events is out of order, but you get the idea).

If that fails, take advantage of the apparent market imbalance and open a jewelry repair business.  Afterward, look at the EDM/broken tap hobby guys on YouTube or bug the tinkerers on CNC Zone.  I've had good luck with the latter and was surprised to find out the former is a thing.  Some people thrive on overcoming the most frustrating of tasks; (the rest of us just end up with spare parts).
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aggie113
Well, Microtech has created a return shipping label, set to arrive Friday.  Don't know if no news is good news.  Previously they called after receiving it to confirm I wanted them to try to remove the broken screws.  Of course they let me know it could end in abject failure with much tears.  They said more than once that the unit could be functional with the remaining screws but I figure either I get back a fully working unit or something that was screwed up so bad it can only be used as display...  And since the planned future is for it to sit behind glass on display I figured might as well take the chance to keep one more of these around in the world.
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aggie113
Got the knife back today.  Haven't taken it apart but looks like they were able to remove the old broken screws.  They have new screws in all the holes, I'll have to break out my calipers to see if they are wider than the originals.  They also included the original screws that were in the knife in little baggie.  The new screws look like a hex head but it's hard to tell.  I'm happy with the results as they did not appear to damage the outside of the casing when making repairs to it 🙂
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aggie113
So measured with my calipers and the old screws were ~1.75mm and new ones are ~1.80mm.  Head pattern is T6.  Didn't see any thread locker on the screw I took out but shouldn't be an issue for a display knife...
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