Totenkopfelite
I am trying to collect all the recently released Microtech Cleartops, just wondering if anyone might know what models are available, I don't want to miss any...

So far I have the D/E and the Tanto, both in the Black Blade versions, I know they offer also the Straight Razor, S/E, and the Hellhound ..

Thanks for your help
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webberding
yeah, that's all, total 5 different blades
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Stabber
Saw a Scarab Clear Top. Killer Piece [thumb]
Lotsaknivesnomoney
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webberding
Stabber wrote:
Saw a Scarab Clear Top. Killer Piece [thumb]


also there has Cleartop Halo III
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dougwtx
One of my area dealers has a Cleartop Ultratech.  Very cool looking.
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MicroMike
Just curious if you mod them all? I think ive heard that there is something your can rub on the clear top that removes the frost?
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Totenkopfelite
I don't modify any of my Microtech knives, I don't even sharpen them, and I have a Wicked Edge System, the best sharpening system available. .

If anything needs to be done, it's handled by Microtech.
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mrtman
If you have a SmoothOn or Reynolds Advanced Materials showroom in your city, or if you just go to their website, you can get a binary polyurethane rubber starter kit and a clear binary polymer kit for less than $60 total.  The process is easier than cooking a decent French dinner and would only require 3-4 hours to make the first of as many clear tops for any MT you want.  The starter kit supplies would be enough raw material for at least 100 of them.

I haven't seen MT's new ones up close, but their old polycarbonate tops were too brittle and seemed to get worse with time.  They also turn yellow over time with UV exposure.  I'm not sure I ever saw a new one without at least some micro fracturing around the screw holes.  Plastics are surprisingly easy to work with, whether you're doing millable or moldable, so it always puzzled me why they had so much trouble.

For example, I bought a Umarex PPK w/ 5x 10rnd mags.  It took about 6 hours to measure the original parts, model, update, and invert the geometry; quick-mill a mold out of jewelers wax; followed by enough runs/cycles to convert all the mag capacities to 13 rounds.  If you're just duplicating an existing part, it doesn't require a mill or a computer and it'll take you 1/3rd-1/2 the time.  SmoothOn will even guide you through the process at their showroom, or even walk you through each step over the phone.

The plastic you see in these pics is not one of their clear variants, (which are actually crystal clear) -- the product I used is intended to be dyed.  For the majority of their products, the end result is much stronger and will last longer than whatever MT was using (and perhaps may still be).

example-plastic.jpg 
example-mold.jpg  example-smokey.jpg 


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